Welsh Government announces potentially 19 new health and care centres

Welsh Government announces potentially 19 new health and care centres

December 11 2017 Nineteen new health and care centres could be constructed across Wales by 2021,...

Socio-economic factors highlighted in study on repeat non-attenders for GP appointments

Socio-economic factors highlighted in study on repeat non-attenders for GP appointments

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Patients registering at GPs increases 113,000 in a month

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  • Welsh Government announces potentially 19 new health and care centres

    Welsh Government announces potentially 19 new health and care centres

    Tuesday, 12 December 2017 12:21
  • Socio-economic factors highlighted in study on repeat non-attenders for GP appointments

    Socio-economic factors highlighted in study on repeat non-attenders for GP appointments

    Thursday, 07 December 2017 17:32
  • Patients registering at GPs increases 113,000 in a month

    Patients registering at GPs increases 113,000 in a month

    Thursday, 19 October 2017 16:03

A inspection imageSeptember 25 2017

Analysis of Care Quality Commission ratings for general practices shows that 86% were rated good, and 4% outstanding. The data also found that 8% were rated ‘requires improvement’ and 2% were ‘inadequate’.

The CQC’s new data indicates there has been a general improvement in ratings on reinspection, compared to when practices were first inspected. The respective figures from the first round of GP inspections were 4% ‘outstanding’, 79% ‘good’, 13% ‘requires improvement’ and 4% ‘inadequate’.

The CQC says that 82% of the general practices that were first rated as ‘requires improvement’ or ‘inadequate’ improved their rating following their most recent inspection. “General practices with the highest ratings are those that demonstrate strong leadership; have an understanding of everyone’s responsibilities in the practice team; have a clear knowledge of the different needs of their patient groups; and recognise the importance of working as part of their wider local health economies,” it said.

Prof Steve Field, Chief Inspector of General Practice at the Care Quality Commission, said: “This is the first time that we have such a detailed national view of the quality of general practice in England, made possible through CQC’s regulation.

“Having inspected and rated 7,365 general practices across the country, we have found that the clear majority are safe and of a high quality. Where we identified concerns, most practices have taken action and improved. GPs, practice managers and other primary care staff should be commended for their efforts.

“The challenge is for this focus on quality to be maintained and for general practice to be supported in continuing to give patients this same high standard of care in future while embracing and driving the changes elsewhere in the system. The pressures on GPs are very real but we have found many practices are already delivering care in new and innovative ways to benefit their patients and the wider community.

Commenting on the report, Professor Martin Marshall, Vice Chair of the RCGP, noted that general practice is the highest performing sector regulated by the CQC. He added: “There is still a long way to go to cut down the bureaucracy and move towards a more proportionate regulatory process for general practice. But family doctors should take heart from this report that their hard work has been acknowledged, and patients across the country should be reassured that when they visit their GP, in the vast majority of cases, they will receive good, safe care.”

Dr Richard Vautrey, BMA GP committee chair, said: “These positive results are undoubtedly down to the hard work of GPs and practice staff, but many are in an environment where they are increasingly struggling to deliver effective care to their local communities.

“The CQC process itself remains overly bureaucratic and continues to result in GPs spending time filling in paperwork when they should be treating patients. In this climate, it is important that any GP practices deemed to be struggling are given the necessary support so that any issues can be addressed.”

The National Director of Healthwatch England, Imelda Redmond, said it was “encouraging to see most practices coping well with current pressures and continuing to provide their patients with good quality care.

“There is still variation in places, but as the CQC’s report underlines, one of the best ways practices can improve is to welcome and recognise the importance of patient feedback. This includes dealing with people’s complaints compassionately and learning from when things go wrong.

“We know that people are keen to share their comments and ideas with their GPs, but most don’t know how. But by keeping it simple, through the use of private and more personal channels such as comment boxes and follow-up text messages, practice staff can make it easy to share feedback and send a strong signal to patients that they are willing to listen,” she said.

“Healthwatch is here to help busy surgeries not only improve how they engage with their patients but also help GPs and practice managers explain how this insight is being used to give people the care they want.”

Links:
CQC announcement        
RCGP comment                 
BMA comment  
Healthwatch comment

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