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toujeo-logo-sanofi1August 10 2015

Sanofi has launched Toujeo (insulin glargine [rDNA origin] 300 units/ml), a long-acting, once-daily basal insulin treatment. It is intended for adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus.

The preparation is “a novel formulation of the glargine molecule Lantus (insulin glargine 100 units/ml) currently used in the treatment of diabetes,” says Sanofi.

Perceived benefits of using insulin glargine 300 units/ml include the injection forms a compact subcutaneous depot with a reduced surface area, and allows for a slower, more prolonged release beyond 24 hours.

Sanofi says that clinical trials evaluating the efficacy and tolerability of insulin glargine 300 units/ml compared to insulin glargine 100 units/ml “demonstrated a similar blood glucose (HbA1c) reduction with a lower incidence of confirmed hypoglycaemia in patients with type 2 diabetes on insulin glargine 300 units/ml compared to those on insulin glargine 100 units/ml.

“In patients with type 1 diabetes, trials demonstrated similar blood glucose (HbA1c) reduction but showed no difference in confirmed hypoglycaemia. Insulin glargine 300 units/ml also showed a more stable and more prolonged glucose lowering effect that lasted beyond 24 hours, and low within-individual blood-sugar variability.”

Sanofi advises that insulin glargine 300 units/ml and insulin glargine 100 units/ml are not bioequivalent and not interchangeable. “Switching from once-daily insulin glargine 300 units/ml, to insulin glargine 100 units/ml results in an increased risk of hypoglycaemic events, mainly in the first week after the switch.

“To reduce this risk, patients should reduce their dose by 20%. When switching to or from insulin glargine 300 units/ml, close metabolic monitoring is recommended during the transition and in the initial weeks thereafter.”

Melanie Davies, Professor of Diabetes Medicine, University of Leicester and Honorary Consultant, University Hospitals Leicester commented: “This new basal insulin is an additional treatment option for doctors to help manage patients who are not currently able to reach optimal glycaemic control.

“Hypoglycaemia is one of the most frequent adverse events experienced by people treated with insulin and fear of these events can prevent some patients administering appropriate insulin doses and can even lead to discontinuation of treatment. The consequence may be poor blood glucose control and an increased risk of long-term complications.”

Link:

Sanofi announcement    

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