MPS advises of need for better awareness of cauda equina red flag symptoms

MPS advises of need for better awareness of cauda equina red flag symptoms

May 9 2018 The Medical Protection Society is advising doctors of a revision to the NICE Clinical...

Anticholinergics linked to increased risk of dementia

Anticholinergics linked to increased risk of dementia

April 30 2018 Anticholinergic drugs used in helping control some involuntary muscle movement...

Women of childbearing potential must be on Pregnancy Prevention Programme if taking valproate

Women of childbearing potential must be on Pregnancy Prevention Programme if taking valproate

April 27 2018 Women and girls of childbearing potential must no longer take valproate medicines...

Buprenorphine may be safer than methadone in opioid substitute therapy, study suggests

Buprenorphine may be safer than methadone in opioid substitute therapy, study suggests

April 23 2018 Buprenorphine has been found to have lower rates of overdose death than methadone...

Class of diabetes drug linked to increased risk of irritable bowel disease

Class of diabetes drug linked to increased risk of irritable bowel disease

March 29 2018 A study has shown that dipeptidylpeptidase-4 inhibitors may increase the risk of...

  • MPS advises of need for better awareness of cauda equina red flag symptoms

    MPS advises of need for better awareness of cauda equina red flag symptoms

    Wednesday, 09 May 2018 16:01
  • Anticholinergics linked to increased risk of dementia

    Anticholinergics linked to increased risk of dementia

    Monday, 30 April 2018 12:20
  • Women of childbearing potential must be on Pregnancy Prevention Programme if taking valproate

    Women of childbearing potential must be on Pregnancy Prevention Programme if taking valproate

    Friday, 27 April 2018 12:12
  • Buprenorphine may be safer than methadone in opioid substitute therapy, study suggests

    Buprenorphine may be safer than methadone in opioid substitute therapy, study suggests

    Monday, 23 April 2018 16:59
  • Class of diabetes drug linked to increased risk of irritable bowel disease

    Class of diabetes drug linked to increased risk of irritable bowel disease

    Thursday, 29 March 2018 11:49

a med diet imageMarch 5 2018

There is no evidence to show any specific nutrient or food supplement affects the risk of cognitive impairment or dementia, a new report has concluded. 

However, while the evidence base is very small, there is “some observational evidence that greater adherence to a Mediterranean dietary pattern may be associated with reduced risk of mild cognitive impairment and dementia.”

The advice comes from the governmental advisory body the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN). It has published a statement on diet, cognitive impairment and dementia having conducted a review of the current research literature.

It found that “there was insufficient evidence to draw any conclusions on the association between individual nutrients (B vitamins, vitamins C and E and omega-3 fatty acids) and risk of cognitive decline or cognitive impairment.” In addition, “there was insufficient evidence to draw any conclusions on the association between polyphenols (including flavonoids) and cognition.”

It also said there was limited evidence around caffeine, but what there is indicates there is no link between caffeine intake and cognition.

Evidence around the potential of a Mediterranean dietary pattern was mainly observational, rather than randomised controlled trials, said SACN. It would like to see more evidence on whether any protective effect of the Mediterranean diet is due to the overall range of foods within it, or due to specific dietary components.

“There was no evidence of protective effects for any of the individual nutrients thought to account for the health benefits of Mediterranean dietary patterns,” it said. “While there is no single Mediterranean diet, such diets tend to include higher intakes of vegetables, fruit, legumes, cereals, fish and monounsaturated fatty acids; lower intakes of saturated fat, dairy products and meat; and a moderate alcohol intake.

“Mediterranean type diets broadly align with current UK healthy eating recommendations as depicted in the Eatwell Guide.” This was published by Public Health England in 2016.

Commenting on the report, Dr Doug Brown, Chief Policy and Research Officer at from Alzheimer’s Society, said: “Dementia is set to be the 21st century’s biggest killer, and with no way yet to cure the condition, prevention is key.

“There’s no evidence that eating a certain food or taking a specific vitamin or supplement can affect the risk of dementia, but we do know that people who eat a Mediterranean style diet tend to have a lower risk of dementia.

“We’re still waiting for proof from big trials to show whether changing your diet can reduce the risk of dementia, and by how much. But eating a healthy, balanced diet can reduce the risk of heart disease, cancer and stroke, so it’s likely eating healthily is a good way to look after the health of your brain too.”

Links:
SACN statement          
Alzheimer’s Society statement

Clinical News

June 22 2018 A review into the scheduling of cannabis for medicinal purposes will look for “significant medical and therapeutic benefits” before a decision is made.
June 6 2018 The Royal College of General Practitioners has called for visa regulations to be reviewed to allow more doctors to work as GPs in the NHS. Home Secretary Sajit Javid announced on Sunday...